Articles By Dr. Janice Robocon

Are you a strong woman?

Photo courtesy of Bonnie van Kessel

Are you a strong woman?

If I were to ask you unexpectedly, how would you answer?

For some women, the answer is automatic: “Of course, I am strong.” For others, the answer is “no” or “I am not sure.” The truth is that how you answer the question is not what determines whether you are strong or weak. Many women who have been labeled as weak (which is common in our culture) – are incredibly strong.

So why have women been considered “weak”?

For many years, women have been viewed as “weak,” and men have been viewed as strong. Historically, men have been portrayed as strong because they are physically strong. And for the most part, they are brave, smart, and non-emotional – especially in difficult situations. Over time, these highly valued traits have become the hallmark of being strong in our culture.

Unfortunately, this shortsighted (and androcentric) description of strength has been extended to women, but it is considerably problematic.

Let’s start with the physically strong. Since men are generally stronger than women, women have an unfair disadvantage. Nonetheless, women have been relegated to a position of weakness and men as strong. But how accurate is this old cultural conclusion? Does physical strength make you strong? Well, I suppose it does in ONE area of life, but a strong body will only take you so far, and – truthfully – some women are stronger than a lot of men. But even if men are generally stronger than women, that doesn’t lay a foundation for strong men and weak women. Besides, strong in body and weak in heart can be the makings of an inconsiderate bully. Surely, a strong body cannot be indicative of strength!

October is a month to be thankful . . .

October is a month to be thankful for so many things . . .

Being thankful is definitely the right attitude, but is there anyone out there who feels more like complaining at times than being thankful?

For example, on a recent trip to Calgary, a truck suddenly pulled out to pass an on-coming car by squeezing in-between the car on my left and myself. The truck missed our vehicles by mere centimeters. There was no time to pull over since the truck literally pulled out at the very last minute. I was shocked, furious, and somewhat frightened. Why would anyone risk so many lives to save a few seconds on the highway? Feeling terrified and angry, I called a friend to complain. I felt entitled to complain – the move was ridiculously stupid – why shouldn’t I complain? Has anyone else experienced something like this?

I am sure that most people would agree that life just isn’t fair. Drivers cut us off, coaches do not always choose the best player for the award, and bosses show favouritism. On top of the daily frustrations, we all have personal struggles that do not seem fair. There are times when we find ourselves swimming against currents that we did not choose or anticipate. So why not complain?